Thursday, September 22, 2016

Birth Dates of Notable Kentuckians: September 23, 1954 - George C. Wolfe














From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia -
(Accessed September 22, 2016) 

George Costello Wolfe (born September 23, 1954) is an American playwright and director of theater and film. He won a Tony Award in 1993 for directing Angels in America: Millennium Approaches and another Tony Award in 1996 for his direction of the musical Bring in 'da Noise/Bring in 'da Funk. He served as Artistic Director of The Public Theatre from 1993 until 2004. 

Early life and education
Wolfe was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, the son of Anna (née Lindsey), an educator, and Costello Wolfe, a government clerk.[1] He attended an all-black private school where his mother taught. After a family move, he began attending the integrated Frankfort public school district. 

He attended Frankfort High School where he began to pursue his interest in the theatre arts, and wrote poetry and prose for the school's literary journal. After high school, Wolfe enrolled at the historically black Kentucky State University, the alma mater of his parents. Following his first year, he transferred to Pomona College in Claremont, California, where he pursued a BA in theater. Wolfe taught for several years in Los Angeles at the Inner City Cultural Center and later in New York City. He earned an MFA in dramatic writing and musical theater at New York University in 1983. 

Career
In 1977, Wolfe gave C. Bernard Jackson, the executive director of the Inner City Cultural Center in the Los Angeles, the first scene of a play he was working on. Rather than suggest that he finish writing it, Jackson said, "Here's some money, go do it." The name of the play was Tribal Rites, or The Coming of the Great God-bird Nabuku to the Age of Horace Lee Lizer. Wolfe stated in an article he wrote about Jackson for the Los Angeles Times that "this production was perhaps the most crucial to my evolution" as an artist.[2] 

Among Wolfe's first major offerings—the musical Paradise (1985) and his play The Colored Museum (1986)--were off-Broadway productions that met with mixed reviews. In 1989, however, Wolfe won an Obie Award for best off-Broadway director for his play Spunk, an adaptation of three stories by Zora Neale Hurston. 

Wolfe gained a national reputation with his 1991 musical Jelly's Last Jam, a musical about the life of jazz musician Jelly Roll Morton; after a Los Angeles opening, the play moved to Broadway, where it received 11 Tony nominations and won the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Book of a Musical. Two years later, Wolfe directed Tony Kushner's Angels in America: Millennium Approaches to great critical acclaim, as well as a Tony award. Wolfe also directed the world premiere of the second part of "Angels", entitled Perestroika, the following year. 

From 1993 to 2004, Wolfe served as artistic director and producer of the New York Shakespeare Festival/Public Theater, where in 1996 he created the musical Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk, an ensemble of tap and music starring Savion Glover; the show moved to Broadway's Ambassador Theatre. His work won a second Tony Award for direction and was an enormous financial success. 

In 2000, Wolfe co-wrote the book and directed the Broadway production The Wild Party.

In late 2004, Wolfe announced his intention to leave the theater for film direction, beginning with the well-received HBO film Lackawanna Blues. 

Despite this move, Wolfe continues to direct plays, such as Tony Kushner's Caroline, or Change and Suzan-Lori Parks' Pulitzer Prize-winning play Topdog/Underdog. In the summer of 2006, he directed a new translation of Bertolt Brecht's Mother Courage and Her Children at the Delacorte Theatre in Central Park; it starred Meryl Streep, Kevin Kline, and Austin Pendleton. 

His latest movie, Nights in Rodanthe, opened in theatres in September 2008.

Wolfe is bringing his artistic talent to the design of the upcoming Center for Civil & Human Rights in Atlanta as its new chief creative officer. 

Wolfe is openly gay.[3] 

In 2013, he was inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame.[4] 

Theater works

Broadway

Year
Title
Credit
Venue
1992
Jelly's Last Jam
Director, writer (book)
Virginia Theatre
1993
Angels in America: Millennium Approaches
Director, producer
Walter Kerr Theatre
1993
Angels in America: Perestroika
Director, producer
Walter Kerr Theatre
1994
Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992
Director, producer
Cort Theatre
1995
The Tempest
Director, producer
Broadhurst Theatre
1996
Bring in 'da Noise, Bring in 'da Funk
Director, producer, lyrics, idea
Ambassador Theatre
1998
Golden Child
Producer
Longacre Theatre
1998
On the Town
Director, producer
George Gershwin Theatre
2000
The Ride Down Mt. Morgan
Producer
Ambassador Theatre
2000
The Wild Party
Director, producer, writer (book)
Virginia Theatre
2002
Elaine Stritch At Liberty
Director, producer
Neil Simon Theatre
2002
Topdog / Underdog
Director, producer
Ambassador Theatre
2003
Take Me Out
Producer
Walter Kerr Theatre
2004
Caroline, or Change
Director, producer
Eugene O'Neill Theatre
2006
Mother Courage and Her Children
Director
Delacorte Theatre in Central Park
2011
The Normal Heart
Director
John Golden Theatre
2013
Lucky Guy
Director
Broadhurst Theatre
2016
Shuffle Along, or, the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed
Director, writer (book)
Music Box Theatre

Filmography

Year
Title
Credit
Role
1989
Trying Times (TV)
Writer (1 episode)
1993
Fires in the Mirror (TV)
Director
1994
Fresh Kill
Actor
Othello Yellow
2004
Garden State
Actor
restaurant manager
2005
Lackawanna Blues (TV)
Director
2006
The Devil Wears Prada
Actor
Paul
2008
Nights in Rodanthe
Director
2014
You're Not You
Director
TBA
The Hairball
Director, writer
 
 
 
 

References

1.    "George C. Wolfe Biography". filmreference. 2008. Retrieved 2008-05-28.
2.    Wolfe, George C. (1996-07-22). "Recalling C. Bernard Jackson's Gift". The Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2010-12-10.
3.    Anne Stockwell (1 February 2005). "Wolfe's New Direction". The Advocate. Archived from the original on 2008-06-17. Retrieved 2008-05-28.
4.    "Cherry Jones, Ellen Burstyn, Cameron Mackintosh and More Inducted Into Broadway's Theater Hall of Fame". www.theatermania.com. 

Selected Sources from UK Libraries:

Hurston, Zora Neale., George C. Wolfe, and Chic Street Man. Spunk : Three Tales. New York, N.Y. (440 Park Ave. S., New York 10016): Dramatists Play Service, 1992. Print.
Fine Arts Library Book Stacks (ML50.C537 S7 1992)

Wolfe, George C., Susan. Birkenhead, Jelly Roll Morton, and Luther Henderson. Jelly's Last Jam. 1st ed. New York: Theatre Communications Group, 1993. Print.
Fine Arts Library Book Stacks (ML50.Z99 J45 1993)

Bernstein, Robin. Cast out : Queer Lives in Theater. Ann Arbor: U of Michigan, 2006. Print. Triangulations.
Young Library Books - 4th Floor (PN1590.G39 C37 2006)

Monday, September 19, 2016

Birth Dates of Notable Kentuckians: September 23, 1941: J Peterman


 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Image from www.holycross.edu
 
 
 
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia -
(Accessed September 19, 2016) 

John Peterman is a catalog and retail entrepreneur from Lexington, Kentucky, who operates The J. Peterman Company. 

Education and baseball career
Peterman graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in 1963 and played third base on Holy Cross baseball teams that went to the College World Series in 1962 and 1963. He also played baseball for the Pittsburgh Pirates organization for three years as a second baseman.[1] 

Career
The J. Peterman Company had sales of over $75 million at its peak. However, after opening several retail stores, it filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in January 1999, and the brand name was sold to the Paul Harris Company.[citation needed] 

Later, when the Paul Harris Company went out of business, Peterman was able to purchase the rights to his own name as a brand, with funding help from John O'Hurley, the actor who portrayed a fictional version of J. Peterman on Seinfeld.[2] With the help of a core group from the original company (creative director, William McCullam, marketing director Jonathan Dunavant, merchant Paula Collins and director of manufacturing Kyle Foster), the J. Peterman Company was relaunched.[citation needed] 

John Peterman wrote a book about the company's trials, Seinfeld influence and more, called Peterman Rides Again. 

Works
  • Peterman, John (2000). Peterman Rides Again. Paramus, N.J.: Prentice Hall Press. ISBN 0-7352-0199-4.
References
1.    "John Peterman Minor League Statistics & History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2013-12-02.

2.    Jong, Mabel (2003-06-06). "J. Peterman catalogs his success: Yada, yada, yada". Bankrate.com. Retrieved 2013-12-02.     

External links
  • The J Peterman Company
  • Peterman's Eye - A daily brief for curious minds
  • The Return of J. Peterman An article about a talk J. Peterman gave at his alma mater, The College of the Holy Cross
  • video of actor John O'Hurley discussing influence of character J Peterman
Selected Sources from UK Libraries: 

Peterman, John. Peterman Rides Again : Adventures Continue with the Real "J. Peterman" through Life & the Catalog Business. Paramus, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2000. Print.Special Collections Research Center Closed Stacks - Ask at desk on 2nd Floor for assistance (HD31 .P3838 2000 )

McCourt, Matthew J. Selling Subjects : Retail Practices of J. Peterman Co. Lexington, Ky.: [s.n.], 2000. Print.Young Library Theses 5th Floor Stacks (Theses 2000 ) and other locations

J. Peterman Co. Catalogues. 1990. Print.Special Collections Research Center Closed Stacks - Ask at desk on 2nd Floor for assistance

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Birth Dates of Notable Kentuckians: September 15, 1866 – Thomas Hunt Morgan















Photograph by John M. Rawls (from bio.as.uky.edu)
  
From The Kentucky Encyclopedia –

Thomas Hunt Morgan, born on September 25, 1866, in Lexington, Kentucky, influenced more than any other the direction of biological science in this country. Internationally, he ranks as the most important contributor to the knowledge of genetics following Gregor Mendel. Thomas was the first of three children of Charlton Hunt and Ellen Key (Howard) Morgan. Morgan's distinguished family included his great-grandfather, Francis Scott Key, who wrote the " Star-Spangled Banner"; a governor of Maryland; his uncle, Confederate Gen. John Hunt Morgan ; and the renowned financier J. Pierpont Morgan. His father had been the American consul to Messina, Sicily.

 Morgan was educated in the preparatory school of the State College (University of Kentucky) and in 1882 enrolled in the college proper. An outstanding student, he graduated at the top of his class in 1886 with a B.S. in zoology. Two years later, with his M.S. completed, Morgan went to Johns Hopkins University, where in 1890 he earned a Ph.D. He began teaching at Bryn Mawr College in 1891, then moved to Columbia University as professor in 1904. In 1928 Morgan became director of the new Kerckhoff Laboratories of Biological Science at the California Institute of Technology. He spent the rest of his professional life at Cal Tech, where he devoted much of his energy to fostering research and graduate programs in biology. That department was a forerunner in the integration of biology and chemistry.

Around 1900 Morgan began exploring the mechanisms of heredity, testing experimentally some of the findings of Mendel and Darwin. By 1908 he was raising fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), which proved to be ideal subjects for studying the role of mutations in heredity. Early in 1910 Morgan concluded that the eye-color gene is located on one of the so-called sex chromosomes, thus establishing the chromosomal theory of inheritance. The discovery that the genes are on the chromosomes of all organisms was a major advance in understanding the physical basis of heredity and led to many other advances.

In 1933 Morgan became the first American nonphysician to win the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine. His numerous other awards and honors included election to the National Academy of Sciences; the presidency of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and several other societies; and the Darwin and Copley medals from England's Royal Society. He characteristically attributed much of the credit for most honors to those with whom he worked. Morgan was active in research until his death. In 1904 Morgan married Lilian Vaughn Sampson; they had four children -- Howard Key, Edith Sampson, Lilian Vaughn, and Isabel Merrick. Morgan died in Pasadena, California, on December 4, 1945, and was buried there.

At the University of Kentucky, both the School of Biological Sciences and the building in which it is housed are named after Morgan. The Blue Grass Trust for Historic Preservation lists as a historical site the house on North Broadway where he grew up.

Selected Sources from UK Libraries:

Shine, Ian., Sylvia Wrobel, and University Press of Kentucky. Thomas Hunt Morgan : Pioneer of Genetics. Lexington: U of Kentucky, 1976. Print. Kentucky Bicentennial Bookshelf.
QH31.M62 S54 1976, Young Library - 5th Floor

Payne, Fernandus. Morgan, the Man and His Contribution to Science. Lexington, Ky.: [publisher Not Identified], 1936. Print.
B M8232, Special Collections Research Center - Biography Collection

Allen, Garland E. Thomas Hunt Morgan : The Man and His Science. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton UP, 1978. Print.
QH429.2.M67 A44, Young Library - 5th Floor

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Birth Dates of Notable Kentuckians: September 13, 1812 – John McMurtry










Image from www.kentucky.com


From The Kentucky Encyclopedia -

John McMurtry, builder and architect, was born September 13, 1812, in Fayette County, Kentucky, son of David and Margaret Griffith (Levi) McMurtry. His parents came to Kentucky from Maryland.

McMurtry received his initial training through apprenticeship to Gideon Shryock, living in 1833 with other apprentices in Shryock's Lexington home. After 1835, when Shryock departed Lexington, McMurtry rose quickly to local prominence.

In 1836 he built the Lexington & Ohio Railroad station, Kentucky's first train depot. In 1839 he designed a dormitory for Transylvania University , and in 1839-40 the Transylvania Medical Hall, a notable structure in the Greek Revival style; it was used as a Union hospital during the Civil War and burned in 1863.

In 1841-42 McMurtry "made a specialty," he wrote, "of the study of architecture" by touring in Europe. In 1842 a European-trained architect, Thomas Lewinski, arrived in Lexington, and the two men collaborated on a number of structures, including Christ Episcopal Church; Loudoun, the Francis Key Hunt residence; the Danville School for the Deaf; and White Hall, the Cassius Clay residence near Richmond. In each instance, McMurtry played the role of builder rather than architect.

McMurtry worked prolifically in a variety of architectural styles for both private and public clients. His most significant achievements were in the residential forms of the Gothic Revival, including Elley Villa ("pointed style"), Ingelside ("collegiate style"), and Botherum (Greek Revival exterior with Gothic interior), all from the period 1850-52. Major Greek Revival specimens include the Elms, the McCauley House, and the Robert and Charles Innes houses, also from the 1850s. His chief Italianate work was Lyndhurst, a residence built in the 1860s. McMurtry produced, in addition, churches, courthouses, amphitheaters, gateways, distilleries, stables, and commercial buildings.

Remarkable for his enterprising versatility, McMurtry built Lexington's first iron-front building; introduced the brick foundation in Kentucky; erected Lexington's first stone business front; and introduced poured concrete sills. He operated a planing mill and a machine shop, was a farmer and a realtor, and secured over a dozen patents ranging from bullets to seed cleaners.

On November 3, 1836, McMurtry married Sarah Ann Taylor; she died September 13, 1838. On September 8, 1842, he married Elizabeth Clark. McMurtry died March 3, 1890, and is buried in the Lexington Cemetery.

JAMES D. BIRCHFIELD, Entry Author

Selected Sources from UK Libraries:

Lancaster, Clay. Back Streets and Pine Trees; the Work of John McMurtry, Nineteenth Century Architect-builder of Kentucky. Lexington [Ky.: Bur, 1956. Print. Kentucky Monographs ; No. 4.
NA737.M42 L3, Design Library

Lancaster, Clay. Gideon Shryock and John McMurtry : Architect and Builder of Kentucky. Place of Publication Not Identified], 1943. Print.
NA710 .L360 1943, Special Collections Research Center


Lancaster, Clay. The Work of John McMurtry ... 1939. Print.
Theses 1939, Young Library - Theses 5th Floor Rotunda


Birth Dates of Notable Kentuckians: September 13, 1911 – Bill Monroe














Image from www.humblepress.com



From The Kentucky Encyclopedia -

William Smith ("Bill") Monroe, known as "the father of Bluegrass music," was born September 13, 1911, near Rosine, Kentucky. He was the youngest of eight children born to James Buchanan and Malissa (Vandiver) Monroe. His Ohio County birthplace lies in western Kentucky, miles from the Bluegrass area and even farther from the eastern Kentucky mountains traditionally associated with bluegrass music.
Monroe came from a musical family. His mother sang and played the fiddle for local dances, his brother Birch played the fiddle, and his brother Charlie played the guitar. Bill Monroe, so the story goes, chose the mandolin so that he would have a better chance to perform with his brothers. After his parents died and his brothers left home for work in the factories of Detroit in 1921, Monroe lived with his uncle, Pendleton ("Pen") Vandiver, whom he credits with teaching him to play the mandolin. By the time Monroe left Rosine to join his brothers, he had already absorbed what would be the primary influences in bluegrass music: the timing of his fiddle-playing Uncle Pen, the high-pitched, emotional singing he had heard in the country churches and singing schools, the mandolin playing of Walter Taylor (Ohio County 's "Mandolin King"), and -- perhaps most important for the development of bluegrass music as opposed to mountain string band or western swing -- the blues-style guitar playing of Arnold Shultz, a black who let Monroe play alongside him at dances. Monroe's distinctive chordal "chop" on the mandolin emphasized the second and fourth beat, which gave bluegrass its drive. In the early 1950s this style was first referred to as "bluegrass."
Bill and Charlie Monroe, working as the Monroe Brothers, performed on North Carolina radio shows beginning in 1927. It was in the Carolina mountains, not those of Kentucky, that Bill was influenced by mountain ballads and mountain-style string bands. In 1938 Charlie and Bill split up, Charlie forming the Kentucky Partners, and Bill the Blue Grass Boys. Bill Monroe and the Blue Grass Boys band, which later included Lester Flatt, Earl Scruggs, and Chubby Wise, joined Nashville's WSM radio in 1939. Monroe then moved to Goodletsville, Tennessee. During the 1940s Monroe combined baseball with bluegrass in traveling throughout the South. He made certain his backup performers could play baseball and often he could field two teams. At its peak the Monroe road show traveled in seven trucks and a stretched-out bus, carrying 1,000 folding seats and a 7,000-capacity tent, a generator-run light plant, a complete kitchen, and the baseball paraphernalia.
Although Monroe has recorded for over fifty years and sold more than 25 million records (under the RCA Victor label during 1936-41, Columbia 1941-49, and Decca/MCA 1950), he considers himself an in-person performer. His performances invariably include ballad-style tunes that he calls "true songs." Monroe is especially well known for his high-pitched, fast-moving renditions of "Blue Moon of Kentucky," "Molly and Tenbrook," "My Rose of Old Kentucky," and "Muleskinner Blues." He has performed in all the states except Alaska, as well as in Canada, Germany, Italy, Japan, and England. He was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1970.
Bill and Caroline Monroe, his first wife, had two children, Melissa and James, before their divorce. His second marriage ended in separation.
GAIL KING, Entry Author

Selected Sources from UK Libraries:

Monroe, Bill, and Blue Grass Boys. Bill Monroe and His Blue Grass Boys. New York, NY: Columbia/Legacy, 1992. Columbia Country Classics.
BCD 7, Fine Arts Media Center


Gebhardt, Steve., Larry. Nager, Bill Monroe, and WinStar Home Entertainment. Bill Monroe Father of Bluegrass Music. S.l.]: WinStar Home Entertainment, 1999.
AV-D5630, Young Media Library


Rosenberg, Neil V. Bluegrass : A History. Urbana: U of Illinois, 1985. Print. Music in American Life.
ML3520 .R67 1985, Fine Arts Library

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Birth Dates of Notable Kentuckians: Paul William “Bear” Bryant – September 11, 1913

 







Image from game.orangebowl.org


From The Kentucky Encyclopedia –

Paul William ("Bear") Bryant, football coach, son of Wilson Monroe and Ida (Kilgore) Bryant, was born on September 11, 1913, in Moro Bottom, Arkansas. He was one of eleven children in a poor family, and he remembered himself in his youth as feeling inferior, not doing well in school, and being lazy. But by the time he retired, Bryant was the college football coach with the most wins: 323 victories, 85 losses, and 17 ties. He compiled this record at four schools: University of Maryland (1945), University of Kentucky (1946- 53), Texas A&M University (1954-57), and University of Alabama (1958-82). His teams won six national championships. Many of his former assistants became head coaches, including Jerry Claiborne, Jack Pardee, and Ray Perkins. He sent more than forty-five players to the pro ranks, including quarterbacks George Blanda , Joe Namath, Ken Stabler, and Richard Todd. His coaching style stressed discipline and maximum effort. Some have said that he coached people more than football.

Bryant began his football career as a burly tackle at Fordyce (Arkansas) High School, where he received All-State honors. There he got his nickname when he wrestled a bear at a carnival. At the University of Alabama, he played football from 1932 to 1935 and helped the Crimson Tide to a 23-3-2 record and a victory in the 1935 Rose Bowl. Following graduation he remained at Alabama as an assistant football coach until 1939; he was at Vanderbilt University during 1940-41.

Bryant served in the navy as lieutenant commander (1941-45). After his discharge, Bryant became the head football coach at Maryland, leading the team to a 6-2-1 record, its first winning season in years. In 1946, following a clash with university president D.H. Byrd, who reinstated a player Bryant had suspended and who fired an assistant coach without consulting Bryant, he left to become the head coach at the University of Kentucky. In his first season Bryant's Wildcats posted a 7-3 mark. Overall at Kentucky, he had an impressive 60-23-5 record and led the Wildcats to four bowl games -- Great Lakes 1948, Orange 1950, Sugar 1951, and Cotton 1952 (losing only the Orange Bowl) -- as well as posting a Southeastern Conference championship in 1950. The highlight of his career at Kentucky came in the 1951 Sugar Bowl, when Bryant's Wildcats defeated the Oklahoma Sooners 13-7 and snapped their thirty-one-game winning streak.

Bryant brought charisma to Kentucky football and made the Wildcats a national force. He had said he wanted to stay at Kentucky until he retired, but on February 4, 1954, he resigned as head football coach, after signing a twelve-year contract extension only a month earlier. Bryant attributed his decision to conflict with basketball coach Adolph Rupp. Both men, highly competitive, wanted top priority for their programs. Bryant, who had believed that Rupp would soon retire, resigned when he found out that Rupp had signed a ten-year contract extension. Bryant went to Texas A&M in College Station. He coached four years there, posting a 25-14-2 record.

Bryant returned to his alma mater in 1958 to become head football coach and athletic director. He led Alabama to twenty-four bowl appearances and six national championships. On November 28, 1981, he broke the collegiate coaching record with 315 career wins as Alabama defeated Auburn, 28-17. He was also instrumental in integrating the Alabama student body in 1971 by recruiting black athletes. Bryant retired following the 1982 season.

Bryant enjoyed duck hunting and fishing in Kentucky, occasionally in the company of his close friend Gov. Lawrence Wetherby (1950-55). In 1934 he married Mary Harmon Black; they had two children, Paul, Jr., and Mae Martin Tyson. Bryant died on January 26, 1983, and was buried at Elmwood Cemetery in Birmingham, Alabama.  

Selected Sources from UK Libraries:

Dunnavant, Keith. Coach : The Life of Paul "Bear" Bryant. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996. Print.
GV939.B79 D86 1996, Special Collections Research Center

Bryant, Paul W., and John Underwood. Bear; the Hard Life and Good times of Alabama's Coach Bryant. 1st Ed.].. ed. Boston: Little, Brown, 1975. Print.
GV939.B79 A32 1975, Young Library - 4th Floor

Huddleston, Walter D., Terry L. Birdwhistell, Sarah Duncan, and Louie B. Nunn Center for Oral History. Walter D. Huddleston Oral History Project. 2001.
OHWDH, Special Collections Research Center - Oral History Collections